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Thread: Painting with Rustoleum

  1. #1
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    Default Painting with Rustoleum

    Yeah, I thought that would get everybody's attention. I frequent an old car forum where there was recently a discussion about painting with Rustoleum. I posted that if it were me, I wouldn't do it. From everything I've heard, the paint will not hold up, either structurally or cosmetically. The responses I got were interesting. A few of the guys claim they have done projects with Rustoleum mixed with reducer and hardener and sprayed on with a gun. They claim the paint is tough and long lasting and looks "good," or what they consider to be good, anyway. One guy claims he got the idea from a high-end resto shop in Atlanta. They do admit that it will fade if in direct sunlight for a long time, so the car should be stored indoors.
    I don't know. It's a bit of a surprise to me. I'm using PPG products on my car and have come to this forum for all my information. I'm curious to know what you guys think of the Rustoleum thing. Not that I'm going to try it.

  2. #2
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    Default

    lol are you serious??

  3. #3
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    Default Hot Rod Falcon

    Hod Rod Magazine done an article on painting a Falcon with Rustoleum.
    They painted with a roller and buffed out the like new!
    I didn't think they would be able to hold him down! hehehe:rolleyes:
    I have the magazine laying around here somewhere.
    Prob could confirm it at the Hot Rod website.
    Talk about paint on a budget. Wouldn't do that to my 70' Monte-Carlo.
    Later, Tim
    [SIGPIC]

  4. #4
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    Default

    It's amazing the different opinions you get. I guess these guys' definition of "nice" has to be factored in. I would like to see a car that's been painted that way five years down the road. I wonder how it really holds up. I'm not doing it with mine. But you should hear them swear by it.

  5. #5
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    Default

    i do not know about rustolieum, but i painted a truck with modified acrylic enamel a few years ago. that was a mistake it did not hold up at all. the people who sell it will tell you that it does not last.

  6. #6
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    Default

    As far as I am concerned it is a Bunch of Boloney for anyone except those on hard times that would have no money No spray gun and a Junker type car.
    it is NOT a viable paint method for any nice car..and it has only came up because Hotrod did a project like that. It will take More sandpaper to sand it flat between coats than you would spend on a Decent spray gun.
    Because someone seen it in Hotrod...now it has become the REAL way to paint a car....Out of Nowhere we paint cars with a Brush in place of a Spray gun. Hotrod did that project too get more magazine sales. the only people I know who make ANYTHING of it are NON painters..soon becoming Experts

    1952

  7. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph
    It's amazing the different opinions you get. I guess these guys' definition of "nice" has to be factored in. I would like to see a car that's been painted that way five years down the road. I wonder how it really holds up. I'm not doing it with mine. But you should hear them swear by it.
    Opinions from Non Painters. Always form your Opinions from people who are in the business.... Otherwise it is just stirring the Pot..well maybe Smoking it.
    Here we go Starting this all over again from the Hotrodders forum
    1952

  8. #8
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    Default Rustoleum

    I wouldn't do it to my 70' Monte-Carlo.
    But......I did it to my buddy's 84 S-10.
    It is his work truck and he was desperate and tight.
    We went to Home Depot and bought a gallon of gloss white, a pint of Japan Drier, a can of "odorless" mineral spirits, and a roll of cheap tape. (We already had some newspapers). We broke all the rules. Spent about 35 bucks.
    He had done a little bondo work in a few spots with 80 grit.
    Friday evening we scrubbed it with some Dawn and a scuff pad.
    Rinsed it off good. and kicked back.
    We got up early Saturday.......10:00am (Early for my bud), taped it up, mixed the paint reduced 10% w/mineral spirits, 1 cap of Japan Drier per quart, & shot that baby with 3 coats in the sun. It laid down slick. And filled the 80grit bondo scratches without primer. That was 8 or 9 years ago.
    It sets under a sap tree when he doesn't drive it. But you can srub it, pull it out into the sun and it's still what I call, "Blind me white". I aggitate him from time to time and tell him we need to do his 69GTO with "Handicap Blue" LOL!

    Anyway in no way would I say it is for everybody, unless your budget has a priority list with beer and cigarettes ranking number one... and that's all you can afford to paint your AMC Concord. I painted my utility trailer a few years ago with Rustoleum but I think I'll stop there.

    Later, Tim
    [SIGPIC]

  9. #9
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    Default Great fence paint

    I don't know about a car but u can paint over a rusty fence with this stuff and it will not rust back. Trailers and such its great on. I would like to try this japan drier. Sounds like cool stuff. POR15 has an excellorater kinda like that and buddy it works fast.

  10. #10
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    Default Japan Drier @ Home Depot

    That stuff quickens the dry time. It got us out of the dust quicker so the mosquito pit he lives in wouldn't mess it up so bad. If you mix too much it will discolor white paint making it marble looking. If I was to use the Rustoleum like that again I would opt for the equipment enamel hardener you get at Tractor Supply for 12 bucks a can. It mixes with a gal. and there is a 30 minute induction period. Stick a fork in this, I'm done. :cool:
    Later, Tim
    [SIGPIC]

  11. #11
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    Default

    I've considered Rustoleum for my old Volvo. The car will never be worth more than 3K no matter how much I fix it up . Even though it's rare, there is is not much demand for them in the US. I also seem to have bad luck with people talking on cell phones ramming me in the trunk at stop lights. My last three cars were totalled this way through no fault of my own. I've decided that if I can just keep them from rusting and look halfway decent it should be good enough till the next ramming.

    I've never painted a car before. I've painted lots of machinery with alkyd Enamel with good results, however, this stuff sits inside. The Rustoleum on my lathe and milling machine holds up real well to oils and cutting fluid. It seems that UV is what takes a toll on Enamels. I've head that White holds out the best and Red fades the worst. It makes sense since White is mostly inorganic Titanium Dioxide which is not affected by UV. Most new colors are organic pigments that need to be clearcoated to resist fading. The old single stage colored pigments were Lead, Cadmium, or Chromium based and were lightfast but toxic and are no longer used. I'll use the White if I go the Rustoleum route.

    I'm going to be painting may car in the driveway, so a low buck paint job should fit well. I've also considered Acrylic Lacquer. It would be faster and easier than Enamel, but would it hold up any better? The only time I've dealt with Lacquer is when I stripped down an old milling machine and an old clawfoot bathtub, both had about 5 coats of enamel over their original lacquer. The paint stripper pulled the Enamel off in sheets but hardly touched the lacquer. I had to scrub and scrape it off with lacquer thinner. So it seems to adhere tenaciously to metal.

  12. #12
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    Default

    I painted my inside floor pans with rustoleum gray. They're going to get covered with some sort of sound deadening, carpet and padding anyway.
    I brush and rolled it.
    I would never do the body with it though





  13. #13
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daminc
    I painted my inside floor pans with rustoleum gray. They're going to get covered with some sort of sound deadening, carpet and padding anyway.
    I brush and rolled it.
    I would never do the body with it though





    I have done that a few time even brushed the floor pans for restoleum. It has its place and thats one of them

  14. #14
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    Default

    If I decide to go with Lacquer on my current project, I'm still going to use Rusto under the hood, on the floorpans, and underneath to keep costs down. Their satin black looks good on an engine bay.

    I used Rustoleum on a car that had rusted out floorpan a couple of years ago. I welded in patches and wirebrushed the welds and used rusty metal primer followed by a black topcoat and it is still holding up underneath with no rust coming back. Their primers have corrosion inhibiting pigments in them so even if the film is scratched, some of the inhibitor dissolves and acts as a barrier to keep the corrosion at bay.

    Rustoleum's true industral primers, which are only available at industrial supply houses, have a higher percentage corrosion inhibitor pigments and are thus a little more expensive. There's probably not much difference between their topcoats from the industrial line to the consumer line from what I can gather from the MSDSs.

    In looking at automotive primers data sheets it seems that only the high end stuff from PPG, Dupont, etc. contain these same corrosion inhibitors. Strontium Zinc Phosphosilicate and Basic Zinc Molybdate seem to be the most popular ones these days. Zinc Phosphate which is used in some mid priced auto primers supposedly does not work as well. Red Lead and Zinc Chromate used to be the gold standards of inhibitors, but Lead is now gone completely, and Chromate is being phased out. The original Rustoleum Red Rusty Metal Primer had Red Lead.

    I could not find any Lacquer primers with corrosion inhibitors. I don't know if this is because of the demise of Lacquer and thus no demand for high end primer, or if the Lacquer seals well enough to keep out moisture...It's most likely the former. So if I go with Lacquer, I'll probably use Epoxy Primer over the repair areas.

  15. #15
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    Default

    I painted a frame w/ Rustoleum 4 or 5 years ago, w/ a brush. Looked OK for a frame, I guess, but hasn't held up very well (maybe insufficient prep?). If I were doing it over, I'd use Zero Rust.

    Rolling on Rustoleum for an exterior finish sounds like one heck of a lot of work for what you end up w/. Read the Hot Rod article-yeah, the materials were pretty cheap and it looks nice (for a while, anyway) not great. But they sanded it a whole bunch of times and it took many days. If your time is worth nothing, maybe it's an interesting science experiment, but I'd MUCH rather get a low buck gun and bargain line urethane.

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