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Thread: Dark Halo Effect Surrounding Touchup Repair

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    9

    Default Dark Halo Effect Surrounding Touchup Repair

    Hi, I recently tried to touchup a chip on my car's paint. It is mettallic silver color. I sanded a small section around the chip area and used a mini hobby style spray gun to apply the paint. I have not sprayed on any clearcoat on the repair area yet. The surrounding area around the chip is darker. A halo kind of effect. It sticks out like a sore thumb. I think this is caused by slight overspray of the paint on the clearcoat of the non-sanded surround area, I am not sure.

    Is this fixable by spraying clearcoat a bit further out over the repair or do I have to redo the repair and sand out the repair area further out to get a better blending of the color by feathering paint?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    West [by GOD] Virginia
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    Default if the blend is that

    noticeable, i would scuff [gray scuff pad= 600 grit] the area a wee bit further. blow more color down....arching that fan pattern [break ur wrist & fling color out further] when the base has flashed, TACK IT OFF. use ur tack rag very lightly over that color & blend area. u'd b surprised @ the dry overspray & how that will accect ur clear. now that u've tacked ur blend....clear that rascal. i go 2 nice med.,wet coats of clear & call it good. i can get 2 mils on 2 coats....i paint a bit heavy & go 100% overlap.
    "Never argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." Alfred E. Newman

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Default

    how long do you usually have to wait before applying the clear? and do you recommend a clearcoat blender to make it match better?

  4. #4
    88GT Guest

    Default

    if your trying to keep it real small like an inch or 2, use very low air pressure. Id wipe it off and try it again before clearing it. once you clear it, thats it. you have to make the spot bigger

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    West [by GOD] Virginia
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    Default hmmmmm

    spotting in clear. ideally the entire panel needs to be cleared. if not, & u have to spot in the clear, shoot a coat of clear, then shoot a coat of reducer on the clear edges. let that flash off, put ur cup of clear back on ur gun & shoot another coat of clear, shoot another coat of reducer again over the blended clear edges. b very carefull when u go to buff or hand rub ur blend area. u may burn back the clear edge. i used to leave a little clear in the reducer to make like a blending solvent. u really need 2 cups....1 with clear, 1 with solvent. practice on a scrap piece b 4 u get to the real thing.
    **ps> dont forget to adjust ur fluid control or u'll have reducer running off the panel....u dont need as much solvent as clear.
    "Never argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." Alfred E. Newman

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Default

    Some products work better than other for spotting in clear. Ideally you want a clear that gets real hard and you allow it to fully cure before you polish it. If you've melted the dry edge into a fine surface scratch it should buff out and you should never see a ring around the spot. If the paint remains soft or the original surface has not been scuffed properly under the edge of the spot then the repair "breaks back" and you see the ring.

    Remember to scuff the surface with 1500 or finer well beyond the area to be sprayed so that you have plenty of room to blend. Dust a little slow reducer on the edge of the spot before the paint flashes, this will melt the dry edge into the sand scratches but don't try to spray enough reducer to make the paint flow or it will run, GUARANTEED, just dust on the reducer.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Default

    would Dupont acrylic clear and clear coat blender be sufficient to spot in the clearcoat? I really don't have the equipement to do the steps recoatlift has suggested.

  8. #8
    88GT Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by red13
    would Dupont acrylic clear and clear coat blender be sufficient to spot in the clearcoat? I really don't have the equipement to do the steps recoatlift has suggested.
    I use Duponts "clear and single stage blender" Not reducer

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Rochester NY
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    Default

    Dupont used to sell a Blender that you could mix in with the material in the cup (19301S). I don't see it on their website anymore but still do at my Jobbers. I have it and have used it several times. They do still list the same thing in a rattle can (A-19301S) and I hear tell it works just as well.

    I generally clean and scuff the entire panel (scuffing gel/paste with a gray scuffing pad) first. Then effect the repair as required (depends if it needs leveling or not) then lay a couple of coats of base (stepping out the second past the first, then the third past the second if needed).

    If you get the Blending Agent that can be mixed with the Clear in the gun, go ahead and lay the first coat of Clear out past the last coat of the base, then step out the second coat of clear past the first (like before).

    You then added the required amount of blending agent to the cup with the remaining clear in it and step out the edge of the last coat of Fresh Clear. Dump what's left in the cup then use the Blending Agent straight and step out past the final edges. Ideally yes you should clean the gun before this step but I use the PPS System so I just grab another cup, I'm not to concerned with what's left in the passages of the gun.

    I don't mask the panel when I'm blending the Clear Coat either.

    Blending is a art and takes some practice so don't be disappointed if you don't get it right the first time.

    Greg
    Thoughts and comments expressed by me are mine based on my own experience and research and shared here freely. I am not a professional nor make any claim to be as such

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Default

    where do you guys get this dupont A-19301S blender, clearcoats and other paint supplies? are most items available locally or are these speciality items that must be ordered online?

  11. #11
    88GT Guest

    Default

    any jobber that carries the Dupont paint line should carry the Dupont blender.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Default

    i am beginning to think that the halo will go away if i just reclear the panel. When i look at the repair area straight on, I can barely see the halo. i only see it when i step further out and at different angles. also if i run my water over the repair area, the halo spot is gone.

    is my assesment correct?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by red13
    i am beginning to think that the halo will go away if i just reclear the panel. When i look at the repair area straight on, I can barely see the halo. i only see it when i step further out and at different angles. also if i run my water over the repair area, the halo spot is gone.

    is my assesment correct?
    If the halo that you're talking about is in the clear it can be caused by a couple of things.

    Problem 1. The new clear was too soft when you polished it.
    Answer1. Wait until the new clear is fully cured before you polish. Heat helps it cure.

    Problem 2. The original paint wasn't prepped properly.
    Answer 2. Make sure your fine sanding scratches will extend beyond the blend area before painting.

    Problem 3. The new clear was not blended well at the edge of the blend.
    Answer 3. Dust a little slow reducer on the edge of the blend to help it melt in and bite the old material.

    All paint materials are not created equal some lend themselves to blending and some do not. If the clear doesn't get real hard it will "break back" easily and show the edge of the blend.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Default

    when applying new clear, how thick should each coat be? especially at the edges of the repair. since i am trying to spot in the clear, should i feather out the clear at the edges so it will be appear to be level? should the clearcoat look wet after it's applied? or will it have a dull look and i;ll have to wait til it fully cured to polish it to have it shine?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by red13
    when applying new clear, how thick should each coat be? especially at the edges of the repair. since i am trying to spot in the clear, should i feather out the clear at the edges so it will be appear to be level? should the clearcoat look wet after it's applied? or will it have a dull look and i;ll have to wait til it fully cured to polish it to have it shine?

    Each coat should be one double pass but on the edges it's just the the oversprayed edge. After I cover the repair area with a couple of coats I reduce the sprayable clear about another 25% and apply another coat extending the sprayed area a little each time I spray. Also tilt the gun slightly so that the blast is directed back toward the fresh paint and not over the rest of the panel.

    Each time you spray you want to make the sprayed area wet enough so that it flows smooth but NOT at the edge of the blend. When you're all finished blending dust a little slow reducer on the dry edge of the blend to help it melt into the sanding scratches. DO NOT try to apply enough reducer to melt the overspray just dust the reducer on lightly so that it doesn't make the thin edge break loose and run.

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